kids at dentist chauvin dental lafayette la

What age should kids start seeing the dentist

It’s a question all parents have, when should you take your kids to the dentist for the first time? And the answer is something a lot of people get wrong. Most children don’t see the dentist for the first time until they’re about two and a half. In reality, they should be seeing one far earlier. How much earlier?

Children should see the dentist within six months of their first tooth erupting, or by age one.

You may be wondering why they need to see a dentist so early. Especially since they’re just going to lose the primary teeth anyway. However, proper dental health is crucial, even in young children. They need to learn how to eat, speak properly, and learn good dental hygiene. If they lose teeth too early due to decay or other factors, that can have a serious impact on their development. That’s why it’s so important that children have all of their teeth until they fall out naturally.

Dental visits can be scary.

If you take your child to the dentist around age one, they most likely won’t be very scared. And if they do get scared, regular dental checkups will make the dentist’s office seem like a regular occurrence. A child that’s over two years of age may be substantially more anxious if the dentist is a new thing. There are some things you can do to prepare your child for the dentist:

  • Take them with you the next time you visit so they can see what it’s like
  • Teach them about the importance of healthy teeth
  • Play dentist with your kids – take turns examining each other’s teeth so they get used to the experience

Make sure you take them to a pediatric dentist. While some normal dentists treat children, pediatric offices are much more suited to children. They’ve been trained on how to deal with kids, and there are often toys and games to keep the children entertained.

Their future dental health can be greatly impacted by proactive dental checkups.

Pediatric dental visits, in addition to caring for your child’s current teeth, will make sure your child’s permanent teeth are developing correctly. Their permanent teeth are visible on x-rays, and their dentist will make sure that all of their teeth are forming correctly, and in the right place. And if there’s going to be a problem, the dentist can take steps to prevent it. For example, stubborn primary teeth may need to be extracted to ensure that the underlying permanent teeth come in the right way.

Pediatric dental health is very important, so make sure you take your kids to the dentist when they’re supposed to go. If you are afraid of or dislike the dentist, try to keep that to yourself so you don’t frighten your kids. Oral health is very important, and linked with heart disease, so make sure they take proper care of their teeth! If you’re having trouble finding a pediatric dentist, call our office and we can recommend a good one.

teething baby chauvin dental lafayette la

Healthy tips for soothing a teething baby

Anyone who has ever dealt with a teething baby knows that it is miserable. They’re in so much pain, and you feel helpless while they cry, bless their little hearts. The good news is, there are things you can do to help!

Signs of teething:

First thing to determine: is your baby just being extra moody? Or do they have another tooth coming in? It’s hard to tell sometimes, especially if the tooth hasn’t broken the surface yet. There are other signs to look for that mean your baby is teething:

  • Lots of drooling
  • Crankiness or irritability
  • Chewing on hard objects
  • Tender/sore gums

They may also be extra clingy, or have trouble sleeping. And who can blame them? They literally have a new tooth breaking through their gums, that has to hurt!

Soothing a teething baby:

If you suspect your baby is teething, here’s what you can do to help.

Medication – you can give your baby acetaminophen or ibuprofen to help reduce the pain and swelling. Always make sure you give them the correct amounts! Check with your pediatrician if you aren’t sure about the correct dosage. Avoid homeopathic remedies, as these have been proven recently to pose a health risk to babies.

Cool them down – cold helps with swelling, so you can use a cold washcloth, teething ring, or spoon, and let them chew on it. Avoid frozen teething rings, as the extreme cold may do more harm than good.

Rub the gums – take a clean finger or soft, clean rag and gently rub your baby’s gums. The pressure does help. If your baby does have other teeth, be careful! When their teeth hurt, they will bite down hard.

Hard food – if your baby has begun to eat solid food, you can give them a carrot, cucumber, or apple slice to gnaw on. Watch them carefully, in case they bite off a piece – as that poses a choking hazard. We recommend the mesh nets that are attached to a teething ring. You can put anything in it, and they can chew safely, without the risk of choking.

Dry their faces – if your child is drooling a lot, try to keep them dry. Wipe their face with a soft clean cloth frequently. Their skin can get irritated from all the drool. You can also use a moisturizer to protect their skin. Just make sure you use one that’s safe for babies!

 

Why does my child need a tooth extraction- dr chauvin lafayette la dentist

Why does my child need a tooth extraction

Why does my child need a tooth extraction- dr chauvin lafayette la dentistIt may not happen at the same time for every child, but at some point, their primary teeth are going to fall out and the permanent teeth are going to erupt. In many cases, a child will lose their teeth at the right time, and their adult teeth will come in with no dental interventions. While that scenario is ideal, sometimes a primary tooth may need to be removed in the office.

There are a couple of different reasons why your child need a tooth extraction:

  • The tooth won’t fall out on its own

If your child has an adult tooth in place that’s about to erupt, and the primary tooth shows no signs of loosening, the primary tooth may have to be removed. If left on its own the adult tooth may come in crooked, or it may damage the primary tooth on its way out, causing further issues. It’s very important that the adult teeth come in correctly. If they don’t, corrective orthodontic action will be needed further down the line. Far better to nip a dental problem in the bud than wait for it to develop into a bigger issue.

  • Overcrowding

Adult teeth are much larger than primary teeth. It normally isn’t a problem, as the adult teeth come in slowly over time ; the child grows, their mouth gets bigger, there’s more room for adult teeth! If the child has an adult tooth ready to erupt and the tooth it is replacing is already gone, but there still isn’t enough room for the adult tooth, a neighboring tooth may need to be removed to insure that the adult tooth comes in correctly.

  • Tooth decay/Trauma

When it comes to primary teeth, depending on the age of the child, and the severity of the decay, sometimes a tooth extraction is easier than filling a cavity. If it’s a very young child whose adult teeth are a long way off, more than likely they’ll need a filling. A child with a fully formed adult tooth ready to erupt? Extracting the damaged tooth makes more sense than repairing a tooth they’re about to lose. This is also the case for trauma. If a child sustains a dental injury (for example, cracking a tooth during a sports event) they will need an extraction.

If you have questions or concerns about your child needing a tooth extraction, call Dr. Chauvin’s office. We will get you scheduled and see if an extraction is the best course of action for your child!